Through June 7, 2016

See this #AmazonGiveaway for a chance to win: Pierre Corneille’s The Cid: English translation by Joseph Rutter and John R. Pierce (Kindle Edition). You need to authorize the “Amazon” application on Twitter to follow or confirm you follow @jrpierce. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You need to be a resident of the United States. Ends the earlier of June 7, 2016 11:59 PM PDT, or when the prize is won. See Official Rules.

The Shepherd’s Holiday

The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy

Sylvia came to live among the shepherds of Arcadia. She and the shepherd Thyrsis are in love. But then she is abducted. Why? What is her true identity? And what is the parentage of Thyrsis, who was found as a child by a shepherd? What will become of Sylvia and Thyrsis when the shepherds are called to entertain the royal court of Arcadia? And what will come of the romantic entanglements of some of the other shepherds and shepherdesses?

Joseph Rutter was a member of Ben Jonson's circle of poets, known for his translation of Corneille's The Cid. The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy enjoyed some popularity in its day. The play was performed about 1634 at the Palace of Whitehall before King Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria, and received public performances at the Cockpit Stage, Drury Lane, London. Professor Felix Emanuel Schelling considered the play “an estimable piece of work not wanting in dramatic power or poetic embellishment.”

Kindle edition

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The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy, Kindle ebook, amazon.co.uk

The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy, Kindle ebook, amazon.ca

The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy (English Edition), Kindle eBook, amazon.de

Paperback

Publication Date: April 26, 2016
ISBN/EAN13: 1532920911 / 9781532920912
Page Count: 152
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 6″ x 9″
Language: English
Color: Black and White
Related Category: Drama / English

amazon.com

createspace.com

The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy, paperback, amazon.co.uk

The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy, paperback, amazon.ca

The Shepherd’s Holiday: A Pastoral Tragi-Comedy, Paperback, amazon.de

English translation of Corneille’s The Cid

In 1637, soon after the first performances in France of Pierre Corneille’s famous play Le Cid, English poet and playwright Joseph Rutter translated the play from the French rhyming alexandrine couplets into English iambic pentameter verse. Two pupils of Rutter, Richard and Edward Sackville, sons of Edward Sackville, fourth Earl of Dorset, may have contributed to Rutter’s translation.

Rutter’s translation was performed at the English royal court before King Charles I and his wife Queen Henrietta Maria, and subsequently at the Cockpit Stage, Drury Lane, London, by the king’s players.

The play, described as a tragicomedy, tells of the Spanish military hero who must avenge an insult to his father by killing in a duel the father of the woman that he loves.

I have edited the 1637 text and have updated the spelling for a new paperback edition of The Cid, and also for a Kindle ebook. I have also added my own translation of two soliloquies that Rutter’s translation had omitted.

Both the paperback and the ebook can be purchased from Amazon.

It is death, not passing.

It irritates me to hear TV newspeople say “passing” when they are speaking of a death.

In his 1983 (or 1984?) book Class: A Guide Through the American Status System, Paul Fussell wrote, “And of course the middle [class] is where you hear false teeth called dentures, the rich called the wealthy, and dying called passing away (or over). (Proles are likely to be taken to Jesus.)”

“The middles cleave to euphemisms not just because they’re an aid in avoiding facts. They like them also because they assist their social yearnings toward pomposity.”

And in the 1950’s, Nancy Mitford in her essay “The English Aristocracy” characterized “die” as U (Upper Class) speech, and “pass on” as non-U (not Upper Class) speech.

Career of Evil

Career of Evil, Kindle edition, amazon.com

This is the third novel in the Cormoran Strike series that J. K. Rowling writes under the pen name Robert Galbraith. Strike and his employee Robin Ellacott remain interesting characters. However, the story seems contrived and, to me anyhow, not really believable and not always interesting. Robin accepts delivery of a package that contains a leg that was severed from a murdered woman’s corpse. The perpetrator is a serial killer with a grudge against Strike. Strike names four suspects. One falls away, apparently having a good alibi, and three remain. Strike and Robin conduct an investigation that involves going to interview people and sometimes watching people’s movements. Not very interesting. The book has more violence, mayhem, and rape than one book needs. Meanwhile, Robin is planning her wedding to Matthew. She is also a potential target of the killer. Eventually we find out who the killer is. Well, it had to be somebody, but so what?